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loss of independence

Loss of independence

Loss of autonomy and dependency

Increased dependency occurs when one develops a partial or total inability to carry out ordinary day-to-day activities, such as maintaining personal hygiene, getting dressed, getting around, eating, etc. This condition is often related to aging and to the decrease, or even loss, of physical and/or mental abilities.

The loss of autonomy is defined especially by the inability to make decisions.

Did you know...?

4.3 million
people take care of an elderly loved one who suffers from a loss of independence.
(DREES, 2008 survey on informal caregivers)

9%
of individuals at least 75 years of age live in a retirement home.
(Insee, 2012)

1SIGNS OF LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE

  • Balance problems: difficulty standing up or walking
  • Memory loss
  • Change in eating habits
  • Diminished personal hygiene
  • Social withdrawal
  • Mood swings
  • Negligent personal hygiene

2EVALUATING LEVEL OF DEPENDENCY

Adults can be classified by their level of dependency based on GIR groups according to the nationally-recognized AGGIR table.* Individuals who are categorized in GIR groups 1 to 4 are eligible for disability allowance, which can help pay for expenses related to increased dependency in part or in full.

AGGIR criteria*

  • Coherence: is the individual able to carry on a conversation or behave in a sensible manner?
  • Orientation: does the individual have a concept of time and always know where they are?
  • Hygiene: what is the individual’s ability to maintain personal hygiene, from head to toe?
  • Getting dressed: can the individual dress, undress and choose their clothes independently?
  • Meals: can the individual help themself to prepared meals and eat alone?
  • Continence: does the individual suffer from incontinence?
  • Mobility: is the individual able to stand up, sit down and lie down alone?
  • Mobility within the home or residence
  • Mobility outdoors
  • Remote communication: what is the individual's capacity to use communication methods such as a telephone, alarm or doorbell?

Responses can be categorized into three levels: the elderly person "can act independently most or all of the time," "can only partially, not all of the time or not correctly act independently" or "cannot act independently."

The GIR groups range from 1 to 6, from the least independent to the most independent.


HOW TO HELP A LOVED ONE WHO IS NO LONGER FULLY INDEPENDENT?


HOW TO FINANCE INCREASED DEPENDENCY?

*Independence, Gerontology Iso-Resources Group

CONFRONTING THE LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE

To help you better understand the impact of the loss of independence and to help you find the right contacts, BNP Paribas offers a practical guide.

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